Shoulder Pain

By | February 14, 2017

3 Steps to Permanent Relief for SI Joint and Pelvic Pain

Today we are going to cover the 3 steps topermanent relief for pelvic and SI joint pain. Now what is SI joint painé The SI joint, ifyou do have SI joint pain, is pain on either side of the tailbone where the tailbone connectsto the pelvis. So this is a drawing of the pelvis. This is your tailbone. This isyour lumbar spine or your lower back, the bones in your lower back called vertebraesitting on top of your tailbone. Then on either side of that you have your right hip or yourleft hip if we are looking at a person from the front. When we see somebody with SI jointpain, they will typically have pain on that given side. 70% of the time, it is on theright side. Don't ask me why that is but

70% of the time we know it is on the right. You canalso get shooting groin pain, buttocks pain and symptoms down the outside of the leg thatis affected. It might be pain, numbness, tingling, burning. Typically, that personsuffers from a heaviness as well. It can also cause some incontinence and leaking issuesas along to effect sexual performance as well. It can be absolutely devastating ifthe pelvic problem is bad enough. Fortunately, most people just have pain on one side. Sowhat can you do about ité That person who has SI joint problems typically has troublerolling over in bed, getting in and out of a car, crossing one leg over the other. Usuallythey have trouble sitting for long periods

of time especially if it is on a couch or a softsurface. So it can be absolutely devastating. Now what are the steps to permanent relieffor thaté Number 1 is this. Most people when we seethem if they are going to try exercises on their own and they only have a little bitof SI joint pain or pelvic pain, they are doing stretches. Yes, there is a very basic stretchwhich most people show me on Day 1. It is a piriformis stretch which is where you grabthe knee and pull it up and across to the opposite shoulder. It will give the personwho suffers pelvic or SI joint problems and pain temporary relief. However, long termwe don't want to stretch. We want to

strengthen or stabilize. Why is thaté Whensomebody has an SI joint problem, so the center of gravity of your entire body is inthe center of your pelvis. That needs to move the right way and it needs to be stable whenyou are doing day to day activities. If it is not stable enough, what will happen is thejoint will move so far that it becomes stuck. So if we are looking at the tailbone, we havethe tailbone and we have the pelvis and you get a normal gliding day to day. If morestress, more force is put through the pelvis than the pelvis itself can handle, that SIjoint can handle, what will happen is you actually become stuck. Now that creates allsorts of problems for the muscle around it.

What most people do is try to stretch theirway out of it. The problem is not stretching and it is not flexibility. It is actuallya stability issue. If we want to stabilize, we need to do strengthening exercises. If you go on ourYouTube channel, on the Madden PT official YouTube channel, there is a tutorialcalled Top 3 Exercises for SI Joint and Pelvic Stability. They are very low grade, kindergartenlevelexercises where you can at least begin stabilizing the muscles that controlyour pelvis. But we don't want to stretch, we want to think stabilize. Step 2 is we want to take a look at our habits.So what are some habits that lead to

pelvic instability and problemsé Number oneis standing with the weight shifted. So if I'm standing like this with my weight shiftedside to side for long periods of time, what that does is over years and years and yearsit weakens the ligaments which are tissue that hold joints together that we can't control.Think about somebody with an ankle sprain. They sprained a ligament. They stretchedthe ligament but it is not a muscle. It is different than a muscle. There are littlehabits that we do. If I stand like this and let's say I weigh 175 pounds and if I'm standinglike this, I have 150 pounds on one side and 25 pounds on the other. Where if I'm standingbalanced, I have 87 ½ pounds on each

Shoulder Pain Treatment Prevention Rotator Cuff Frozen Shoulder Sock Doc

Hey this is Gangemi and welcome to ournewest Sock Doc tutorial. Today we're going to talk about the shoulder andthe shoulder joint in general. Helping out today is Madison McCarroll.Thanks for joining. Madison's a great rower in the area. The shoulder you know most people think aboutthe shoulder as just like a certain area which it obviously is but it'sreally combined of three joints and three bones. So it's a very dynamic areathat's used to, you know, we use our shoulder all day long. We use it tosupport things, we use it to

lift things, we use it to carry. It's actually one of the most common areasthat people injure and you can injure your shoulder, the shoulder area, inso many different ways. A lot of times people will tear their rotator cuffor sprain or strain their rotator cuff. They will get stuff like tendonitis,bursitis, or perhaps a frozen shoulder is also very common. So theseare some of the things we're going to talk about. So the three joints of the shoulder prettymuch we have a sternoclavicular

joint. Our clavicle is here. That's that bonerunning across the top. People know it as their collarbone. And thejoint here where it hits your sternum which is your breast bone, not goingto talk about really today because there's not a whole lot going on there.The two other joints are going to be our major function, or our majorfocus, because that's where a lot of the injuries occur. First one we're going to talk about is yourAC joint which is also known as your acromioclavicular joint and that's ifyou trace your collarbone to the

outside here you're going to hit a littlebump which is the acromion of your scapula which is your shoulder blade.And then that's where it attaches to your clavicle which is your collarbone. Now if you come down just on the inside there,so you find that dip on the end of your collarbone and then dip rightdown, you have what's called your coracoid process. Now this AC joint is very,very important to understand because it's where people get things likea frozen shoulder. And they can also get generalized shoulder pain if thisjoint is not moving properly.

So a frozen shoulder is basically if you cannotlift your arm, a lot of people can't lift it at all, or especiallyabove parallel. So if you can't lift your arm anywhere over your shoulderor if you can't do it freely without pain a lot of people are diagnosedas a frozen shoulder. But again, especially if you can't even just move itat all. Typically it's because the AC joint is locking up. Three major muscles going there. You've gotone of your pec muscles, your pec minor, which comes up from your chestand inserts into that coracoid

process. We also have your biceps, one ofyour biceps, the short heavier biceps that has to do with this, obviouslycurling, flexion of the arm. That pec minor is more of an across the body,especially with your palm up, type motion. It supports a lot of the ribmuscles. And then also a very important muscle calledyour coracobrachialis. Now this muscle we kind of associate when someonehas pain if they say are washing or combing your hair, like so. Andyour shoulder hurts even just doing that, not necessarily if you have afrozen shoulder but if just you

Shoulder Pain All About Tendonitis Frozen Shoulder Bursitis and Rotator Cuff Tear

Shoulder pain affects everyone. Some people get tendonitis. Other folks get bursitis. Frozen shoulder is also quite common. Personally, my shoulder pain comes from shoulder impingement syndrome.

Sometimes I have right shoulder pain and other shoulder pain symptoms. Other days I suffer from left shoulder pain and then do shoulder pain exercises and go get shoulder paintreatment. I always have shoulder pain when to see a .

This is why I made a tutorial about shoulder pain.

Leave a Reply