Osteoarthritis Nih

By | August 14, 2018

The most fun I ever had getting rid of my joint pain Saturday Strategy

Fly. I'm so limber. Why am I limber and whyam I so fired up today Fitliferé It's the juice baby! Alright Fitlifer. Welcome to anotherexciting episode of this week's Saturday Strategy. I'm so glad you're in my kitchen. Today weremaking a juice recipe with some of my favourite ingredients. Did you know, 20 percent of peoplethat means if you look around you right now, there's five people, that means one of youis dealing with chronic pain. Perhaps you have arthritis, you feel it, you wake up inthe morning, it's hard to get up and just, just like zombies in the park. That's whatpain will do to you. Juice. Juice. I'm not gonna eat somebody's brain or anything. Butpain is bad news. So what do most people doé

did you know 84 percent of americans thatare in pain pop over counter medicine. Does that really help anybodyé What really helpspeople, Apocrasy said it best, 400 BC is that let thy food be thy medicine and let medicinebe thy food. so what kind of juice can we drink to help remedy painé real simple andeasy fitlifer. bring it in. I want to introduce you to my friend, mr. pineapple. Mr. Pineappleis loaded with bromaline. Chikita banana, everyday! Get the banana everyday! drink yourjuice everyday. this is an antiinflammatory, natural agent in pineapple. righté so evenif your inflamed anywhere in your body, you got sinus inflammation. Inflammation in youjoints, in your legs, inflammation in your

lower back. Rewind 3 or 4 years ago, I hadchronic lower back pain. Most of the time when I'm would work, I have to stand up. Becausemy lower back hurts so bad, and I wish, I had this juice recipe then. So, what is thejuice recipeé Pineapple, 4 stalks of celery, Lemon as the alkalizing agent and carrots.Yah. What's up docé Okay. Carrots are really good with inflammation as well. We got 6 carrotshere. We're gonna cut this off. And were gonna drop 'em in the juicer. If you want more naturalremedies, just like this, check out juicewithdrew . on the link below this tutorial. So let'sgon with this recipe. We got pineapple which is about an inch on this thing. We're gonnameasure out. Were gonna cut the edges off.

Some people juice this thing, but I don't.But you can try presses. Oh my God! Nature's candy! You know what to feed your kids insteadof candyé Pineapple. Bad boy on. Were in. You no longer crave for cheeseburgers, cheeses,all the various snacks that out there. Trick your toxic little taste buds. And you actuallylove this juice recipe if you don't know already. Wow! That is absolutely delicious! That'samazing! I just feel so much limber in drinking this. That's some good stuff fitlifer. That'ssome really really good stuff. I want you to try this recipe, this week! Commit to it!Ingredients, carrots, celery, pineapple, a little bit of lemon, Absolutely delicious.Your gonna love it! I know you are. And I

want you to start examining in your life.Why you chooseé And if your having trouble staying committed to an exercise or fitnessprogram, or juicing, or if you purchased the juice with drew system, I want you to startunderstanding, why you do ité Well for me, I wanna live a long long life. I have friendsaround me, and maybe you do as well, that are experiencing things like cancer, heartdisease, And all this other ailments. I don't wanna be like that. So every single day, I'mgonna make my best effort in becoming the best version of myself. And I know if yourwatching the tutorial, you are as well. I know your committed. I know your working hard.And sometimes I fall out the bandwagon. I

have a giant cheeseburger, I mess up. I workoutfor 3 full days in a row and I'm sure there are things you know you should be doing butsometimes, you just fall. But that's ok. I still love yah. I'll still be here for you.Because when totally I say were in this together, I mean it. Here with you. Make this juicerecipe. If your looking for a community, to support you on your mission, on your journeyThat people that will love you, and hold you, will take you to your highest good, I encourageyou with juice with drew system. That's what I'm offering you today. again, remember, werein this together. I'll see you soon! Juice. Drop that. NASA. Were on a space mission todaywith the celery vehicle. Were about to launch

The NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative

The NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is a joint disease marked by the gradual loss of cartilage that cushions and protects the bones, abnormal bone growth around the joint, and other joint changes that cause pain and disability. An estimated 27 million Americans age 25 and older have

osteoarthritis, and the knee is among the most commonly affected joints. There are currently no treatments other than surgical joint replacement that change the course of the disease, and al trials for prospective therapies are long, difficult and expensive. Current methods of evaluating osteoarthritis disease progression, including Xrays and blood tests, are not accurate enough to be used

in al trials of potential treatments. Scientists, health care providers and drug companies need biochemical and imaging markers of how osteoarthritis progresses to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease. In response to this need, the NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative was established. The Osteoarthritis Initiative is a multicenter study of knee

osteoarthritis that involves repeated observation of a set of subjects over time. This publicprivate partnership is a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and pharmaceutical companies. It consists of four al centers, a data coordinating center, and a steering committee that advises on the scientific aspects of the study. The Osteoarthritis Initiative is a premier example of how industry, government and the academic sector can work together to

enhance and extend biomedical research in ways not possible by one individual entity. Nearly 5,000 individuals are being tracked over time with the goals of understanding the natural progression of knee osteoarthritis from onset to total joint replacement and identifying biomarkers and risk factors associated with it. A public repository of osteoarthritis al data,

radiological information and biological specimens has been developed. Making this information available to researchers worldwide is expediting the pace of scientific advancements in these areas. Scientists throughout the world are using this public resource to test biochemical and imaging markers of disease progression, to further the development of osteoarthritis drugs, and to improve public health.

NIH and NASA collaborate on International Space Stationmp4

Natalie: At 300 miles above ground, NASA's International Space Station, ISS, is home to a microgravity laboratory where NIH researchers work closely with astronauts to perform biomedical experiments. VO: These experiments conducted in the space station address such issues as to how bone and muscle deteriorate, how humans fight infectious disease, and how cancers grow and spread.

McGowan: Well, it's a unique environment. It's one that many of the NIHsupported researchers are interested in, the effects of gravity on cells, and it's not just bone and muscle cells, but all the cells in the body are affected by gravity, and that's an environment that is truly microgravity, it's not quite zero, but it's impossible to replicate on Earth. VO: It's this special microgravity environment and its influence on human health and disease that led to the 2007 partnership

between NASA and NIH.allowing for a segment of the ISS to be used for biomedical research, holding immense opportunities for NIH researchers. Zimmerberg: I'm glad that people are now getting the opportunity to do these important experiments, because the microgravity on the space station is all we need for that problem. We don't need to go to the moon, we don't need to go to Mars to answer the question of how this new environment

affects human life. VO: In fact, Zimmerberg began collaborating with NASA in 1994, when NASA provided NIH with a rotating wall vessel called a bioreactor. Even though this machine was used on earth, it mimicked microgravity, allowing scientists to look at tissue cultures in a 3D format. Zimmerberg: And the hit was that we discovered that human

lymphoid tissue, which normally is the tissue that puts out antibodies when you get an infection, was unable to operate in this suspension culture. And we used a very simple tissue that everyone knows, that'many kids have their tonsils taken out, and tonsil are lymphoid tissue. VO: After making this discovery here on earth, Zimmerberg and his team initiated their first ISS project in space, taking their research to a real microgravity environment.where they could

better understand why the communication between two main types of lymphatic cells, called B and T cells, do not function in microgravity. Zimmerberg: But until we go all the way into space with some of these issues, until we begin to find out why microgravity is having an effect on cellcell communications when all the calculations you can make in the world indicate that there's nothing in our cells or tissues that should respond to microgravity at all.

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