Osteoarthritis Knee Questionnaire

By | June 6, 2017

3 Steps to Permanent Relief for SI Joint and Pelvic Pain

Today we are going to cover the 3 steps topermanent relief for pelvic and SI joint pain. Now what is SI joint painé The SI joint, ifyou do have SI joint pain, is pain on either side of the tailbone where the tailbone connectsto the pelvis. So this is a drawing of the pelvis. This is your tailbone. This isyour lumbar spine or your lower back, the bones in your lower back called vertebraesitting on top of your tailbone. Then on either side of that you have your right hip or yourleft hip if we are looking at a person from the front. When we see somebody with SI jointpain, they will typically have pain on that given side. 70% of the time, it is on theright side. Don't ask me why that is but

70% of the time we know it is on the right. You canalso get shooting groin pain, buttocks pain and symptoms down the outside of the leg thatis affected. It might be pain, numbness, tingling, burning. Typically, that personsuffers from a heaviness as well. It can also cause some incontinence and leaking issuesas along to effect sexual performance as well. It can be absolutely devastating ifthe pelvic problem is bad enough. Fortunately, most people just have pain on one side. Sowhat can you do about ité That person who has SI joint problems typically has troublerolling over in bed, getting in and out of a car, crossing one leg over the other. Usuallythey have trouble sitting for long periods

of time especially if it is on a couch or a softsurface. So it can be absolutely devastating. Now what are the steps to permanent relieffor thaté Number 1 is this. Most people when we seethem if they are going to try exercises on their own and they only have a little bitof SI joint pain or pelvic pain, they are doing stretches. Yes, there is a very basic stretchwhich most people show me on Day 1. It is a piriformis stretch which is where you grabthe knee and pull it up and across to the opposite shoulder. It will give the personwho suffers pelvic or SI joint problems and pain temporary relief. However, long termwe don't want to stretch. We want to

strengthen or stabilize. Why is thaté Whensomebody has an SI joint problem, so the center of gravity of your entire body is inthe center of your pelvis. That needs to move the right way and it needs to be stable whenyou are doing day to day activities. If it is not stable enough, what will happen is thejoint will move so far that it becomes stuck. So if we are looking at the tailbone, we havethe tailbone and we have the pelvis and you get a normal gliding day to day. If morestress, more force is put through the pelvis than the pelvis itself can handle, that SIjoint can handle, what will happen is you actually become stuck. Now that creates allsorts of problems for the muscle around it.

What most people do is try to stretch theirway out of it. The problem is not stretching and it is not flexibility. It is actuallya stability issue. If we want to stabilize, we need to do strengthening exercises. If you go on ourYouTube channel, on the Madden PT official YouTube channel, there is a tutorialcalled Top 3 Exercises for SI Joint and Pelvic Stability. They are very low grade, kindergartenlevelexercises where you can at least begin stabilizing the muscles that controlyour pelvis. But we don't want to stretch, we want to think stabilize. Step 2 is we want to take a look at our habits.So what are some habits that lead to

pelvic instability and problemsé Number oneis standing with the weight shifted. So if I'm standing like this with my weight shiftedside to side for long periods of time, what that does is over years and years and yearsit weakens the ligaments which are tissue that hold joints together that we can't control.Think about somebody with an ankle sprain. They sprained a ligament. They stretchedthe ligament but it is not a muscle. It is different than a muscle. There are littlehabits that we do. If I stand like this and let's say I weigh 175 pounds and if I'm standinglike this, I have 150 pounds on one side and 25 pounds on the other. Where if I'm standingbalanced, I have 87 ½ pounds on each

Stem Cell Therapy bone marrow concentrate for osteoarthritis

In the next tutorial I'll report on another studyshowing the effectiveness of stem cells in the treatment of osteoarthritis.New Study Shows Positive Results with Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC) Injection for KneeOsteoarthritis Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC) has evolvedin recent years as a one of the most promising therapies for Osteoarthritis (OA). The antiinflammatoryand regenerative properties of BMC have been shown in early studies to relieve pain andstiffness, as well as improve joint function, in patients suffering from degenerative arthritis. A recent study, reported by Julie Patchis,published in the European Journal of Surgery

and Traumatology evaluated 41 patients (75knees) with a mean age of 60.7 years old, diagnosed with degenerative arthritis, whounderwent intra articular injection of BMC with adipose tissue. Each patient was assigneda radiologic arthritis score (IIV) via the KellgrenLawrence grading scale, and PrePostoperative Visual Analogue Score (VAS) and functional scores were used for evaluationat 3, 6, and 12 months. The study revealed a decrease in the meanVAS from 7.0 preoperatively to 4.1, 3.5, and 3.3 at the 3, 6, and 12 months follow up appointments.Functional improvements were also illustrated via the International Knee Documentation Committeescore, SF36 score, Knee and Osteoarthitis

Outcome score, and the Lysholm Knee Questionnaire. The results contribute to the growing researchtrends supporting the treatment of OA with intra articular injections of BMC. However,less impressive improvements were seen in Grade IV arthritis patients and this suggestsBMC to be more effective in early to moderate phases of degenerative arthritis. Although,further studies are needed to more thoroughly evaluate the efficacy of BMC therapy, thisstudy adds further support to the regenerative potential of bone marrow for degenerativejoint diseases such as arthritis.

Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis Guideline for Nonsurgical Management

Hello, I'm Norman Swan. Welcome to this programon the new guidelines for the nonsurgical managementof hip and knee osteoarthritis. It's a timely program, as we're broadcastingduring Arthritis Awareness Week. Arthritis, as you know, is a major causeof disability and chronic pain. There's around 100 different formsof arthritis, and osteoarthritis is the most common.

This program is the thirdin a series of four on the musculoskeletal guidelines that have been developedby the Royal Australian College of GPs and approved by the NH and MRC. This program will cover the diagnosisof osteoarthritis and discuss recommendednonpharmacological and pharmacological interventions in a multidisciplinaryprimary healthcare setting.

As always,you'll find a number of resources available on the Rural Health EducationFoundation's website: Let's meet our panel. Geoff McColl is a rheumatologistand professor of Medical Education and Trainingat the University of Melbourne. Welcome, Geoff. Thank you, Norman. Geoff is the current president ofthe Australian Rheumatology Association and was part of the working partydeveloping this guideline.

Rana Hinman is a physiotherapistand senior lecturer in the University of Melbourne Schoolof Health Sciences. Welcome, Rana. Rana has particular expertisein evaluating conservative treatments for osteoarthritis, and was alsoa member of the working party. Michael Yellandis a general practitioner and associate professorof Primary Health Care at Griffith University in Queensland.Welcome, Michael. His teaching and research interestsfocus on evidencebased diagnosis

and the treatmentof musculoskeletal pain. And David Ng, who's a pharmacist and director of the South Australianand Northern Territory Branch of the Pharmaceutical Societyof Australia. Welcome, David. Thank you, Norman. From the home of fish oil. That's correct. We'll talk about fish oil later to see whether or not it'sthe magic panacea for osteoarthritis.

Many myths about osteoarthritis,Geoffreyé There are many myths, Norman. Probably the best place to start is that this is an illness that you acquireas you grow old that you can do nothing about. You're just going to creak your wayto the wall at the bottom of the garden. Absolutely. There's a certain acceptancethat this is the way it will be. NORMAN:Are you telling me it's reversibleé

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