Knee Arthritis Where Does It Hurt

By | October 6, 2018

3 Steps to Permanent Relief for SI Joint and Pelvic Pain

Today we are going to cover the 3 steps topermanent relief for pelvic and SI joint pain. Now what is SI joint painé The SI joint, ifyou do have SI joint pain, is pain on either side of the tailbone where the tailbone connectsto the pelvis. So this is a drawing of the pelvis. This is your tailbone. This isyour lumbar spine or your lower back, the bones in your lower back called vertebraesitting on top of your tailbone. Then on either side of that you have your right hip or yourleft hip if we are looking at a person from the front. When we see somebody with SI jointpain, they will typically have pain on that given side. 70% of the time, it is on theright side. Don't ask me why that is but

70% of the time we know it is on the right. You canalso get shooting groin pain, buttocks pain and symptoms down the outside of the leg thatis affected. It might be pain, numbness, tingling, burning. Typically, that personsuffers from a heaviness as well. It can also cause some incontinence and leaking issuesas along to effect sexual performance as well. It can be absolutely devastating ifthe pelvic problem is bad enough. Fortunately, most people just have pain on one side. Sowhat can you do about ité That person who has SI joint problems typically has troublerolling over in bed, getting in and out of a car, crossing one leg over the other. Usuallythey have trouble sitting for long periods

of time especially if it is on a couch or a softsurface. So it can be absolutely devastating. Now what are the steps to permanent relieffor thaté Number 1 is this. Most people when we seethem if they are going to try exercises on their own and they only have a little bitof SI joint pain or pelvic pain, they are doing stretches. Yes, there is a very basic stretchwhich most people show me on Day 1. It is a piriformis stretch which is where you grabthe knee and pull it up and across to the opposite shoulder. It will give the personwho suffers pelvic or SI joint problems and pain temporary relief. However, long termwe don't want to stretch. We want to

strengthen or stabilize. Why is thaté Whensomebody has an SI joint problem, so the center of gravity of your entire body is inthe center of your pelvis. That needs to move the right way and it needs to be stable whenyou are doing day to day activities. If it is not stable enough, what will happen is thejoint will move so far that it becomes stuck. So if we are looking at the tailbone, we havethe tailbone and we have the pelvis and you get a normal gliding day to day. If morestress, more force is put through the pelvis than the pelvis itself can handle, that SIjoint can handle, what will happen is you actually become stuck. Now that creates allsorts of problems for the muscle around it.

What most people do is try to stretch theirway out of it. The problem is not stretching and it is not flexibility. It is actuallya stability issue. If we want to stabilize, we need to do strengthening exercises. If you go on ourYouTube channel, on the Madden PT official YouTube channel, there is a tutorialcalled Top 3 Exercises for SI Joint and Pelvic Stability. They are very low grade, kindergartenlevelexercises where you can at least begin stabilizing the muscles that controlyour pelvis. But we don't want to stretch, we want to think stabilize. Step 2 is we want to take a look at our habits.So what are some habits that lead to

pelvic instability and problemsé Number oneis standing with the weight shifted. So if I'm standing like this with my weight shiftedside to side for long periods of time, what that does is over years and years and yearsit weakens the ligaments which are tissue that hold joints together that we can't control.Think about somebody with an ankle sprain. They sprained a ligament. They stretchedthe ligament but it is not a muscle. It is different than a muscle. There are littlehabits that we do. If I stand like this and let's say I weigh 175 pounds and if I'm standinglike this, I have 150 pounds on one side and 25 pounds on the other. Where if I'm standingbalanced, I have 87 ½ pounds on each

Explain my Knee Arthritis Xray

Hi, it's Centeno. And today we're going tofocus on new research that shows that your kneexray is probably pretty useless in diagnosingwhy your knee hurts, or at least it's not asvaluable as we once thought. Now, this may come as acomplete surprise to you because xrays andMRIs are commonly

used by physicians to makethe diagnosis of arthritis and then conclude thatthat's why the knee hurts. So if we look at thestandard xray grading scale, we can see that it goesfrom normal to mild to moderate to severearthritis on an xray. And it would bevery, very attractive to say that this gradingscale equals pain,

meaning the more arthritisyou have on the xray the more your knee has to hurt. Regrettably, a lot of researchnot just the little bit of research I'll go over heretoday, but a lot of research has shown that that'snot the case at all. So this will look at a new studyof the pain marker called NPY. And the name of themarker isn't really that important NPYis neuralpeptide Y

but it's just thatthere is a marker that you can get out of theknee that correlates well with knee pain. And that's the citation of therecent research on this pain marker. And what's reallyinteresting is that if you look at the levels of thispain marker in the knee there's a veryelegant association

between the levels ofthis pain marker and pain that people report. So that's the levelif you are healthy. This is the level if youhave some osteoarthritis but no pain. This is the level if you havemild pain and knee arthritis. This is the level ifyou have moderate pain and then strong painand then severe pain.

So you can see this very elegantrelationship between the amount of pain that peopleare reporting and the levels of thispain marker in their knee. On the contrary, though, if welook at the amount of arthritis that's on an xray likewe just did and then track that versus this pain markerwhich is directly associated to how much pain people arereporting, here's what we see. So that's the amountof pain marker

Knee Pain With Exercise SURPRISING CAUSE and HOW TO FIX IT

What's up, guysé Jeff Cavaliere, ATHLEANX.COM. Let's talk today about knee pain. If you've been lifting for any length of time,likely you've had some sort of knee pain or might have knee pain in the future if you'renot doing the right things. Guys, knee pain can debilitate your leg workouts.I know. I've suffered from it, and I know what it can do to your legs when you're tryingto squat and especially squat heavy. So, what I want to do today is first of allcover a couple of the reasons what might be causing your knee pain

because that's going to be important to understandthe difference, and then show you one that I think is really common especially for guysthat train and lift weights. So, if we look here, we've got our boy Raymond,and we've got our skeleton, so what you'll see is that in the knee we've got a lot ofdifferent sources of pain. Now you guys have probably heard about ACLpain and MCL pain and LCL, right. Well we're talking about tears really because those are ligaments that get injuredsports most often. The ACL and PCL are inside the knee.

The LCL and MCL are going to be on the insideand outside of the knee, and basically, that's just one source of injury but we've also gotosteoarthritic changes that can happen where you actually get degenerative changeson the bone, the bone on bone area, or on the underside of the patella here that grindsup against the femur. We could talk about that in a second. We alsohave meniscus issues. Guys talk about that. It's the cushion between the two bones here,the tibia and the femur, that gives us that space between the jointthat can wear down or tear. But I find that the most common injury that we get when wetrain,

our inflammatory conditions from overuse ofthe patellar tendon. So, the patellar tendon, this is what you're seeing right here,ok. And what it does is, it runs over the patella,here it holds it in place, and you can get inflammation of this a lot of times causingpatellofemoral issues, we've heard that before, and it impacts thetracking of the patella when your knee goes into flexion extension. So, as we flex the knee and extend the knee,you want normal mechanics of the patella so you get this glide.

And it glides right in this groove right here.You can see that it's supposed to glide right in this groove. But what will happen is, it starts to getout of position. Well, guess whaté This isn't a knee issue. I've talked about this before,this is not a knee issue. The knee is a train, and this is its track.Here, and here. So guess what happens when the track gets twistedé The knee in the train goes flying off thetrack. So, when you start looking and focusing all your efforts on the knee pain and tryingto, you know, cure the patellofemoral issues,

or try to cure your patellar tendonitis, andyou're not paying any attention to the track, you're way off track. So, what you want to do is, you want to startlooking for the source and the cause of your knee pain because most often, 99 percent ofthe time, the source of that is going to be somewhereelse. And when we look at this, it's either going to be the track at the bottom, whichis going to be controlled by your ankle and foot, or, the track at the top which is going tobe caused by, or controlled by the muscles

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